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Posts Tagged ‘free play force on force exercises’

Along with BG (ret.) James Warner, I was invited by Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Institute for National Strategic Studies of the National Defense University to speak at a round table called “Building Adaptive Leaders.”

Here is a transcript of what I talked about (BG Warner focused on the operational and strategic levels of development, and our views parallel and support one another).

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I just spent the last four weeks at various locations¬†presenting my “Deciding Under Pressure and Fast” workshop on how to teach adaptability and create learning organizations.¬† A common question, a subtle point of resistance, is always “We agree with what you are putting us through. It is better than what we do now, but we don’t have the instructors to do what you teach. Can you help, tell, us how to certify instructors?”

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Joe and Fred thanks for your comments and input. I will continue to build off that. I look forward to more input, particularly, not only military but other real world examples of “how to” with adaptabilty.

Execution of free play force on force exercises with cadets.

I am using an example that Joe knows to well, but gets at one of my objectives of this blog is to provide real world examples (good and bad) of how to develop and nurture adaptability to share with others.

When I was the OPS officer and XO of the Georgetown ROTC program, we did many free play exercises. The one that most of my former cadets remember the most is the fall semester FTX which centered around a 24 hour free play force on force exercises. In this exercise, we did a lot of things that people said that could not be done. I must add, that during this time, both of my bosses (the professor of military science or PMS) were supportive and also got into the play as cadre tactical officers or observers. This example is given in five parts, an overarching scenario which includes our objectives, terrain and scenarios and an overview of what was done. Part 2 is discussion of the blue forces mission, part 3 is discussion of the oppossing forces mission, Part 4 is cadre preparation, and finally Part 5 is a summary of what happened (we did this exercise several times, so I will try to highlight key points over five years).

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