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Archive for the ‘How to develop adaptability’ Category

Boyd08 Moving Ahead

Boyd 2008 Conference Agenda – Moving from Theory to Action

The first draft agenda for the December 6-7 conference is now up on Rob Paterson’s blog.  Please look it over and, if you haven’t already done so, join the discussion on the Boyd08 blog.

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A couple of weeks ago Lieutenant Fred Leland of the Walpole Police Department posted his summary of my Deciding Under Pressure and Fast workshop I conducted at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York on August 7, 2008. I just returned home from four successful weeks of doing a total of six Deciding Under Pressure and Fast workshops at four different Army posts, which focuses on how to teach in the Adaptive Leader Methodology (ALM). I also do curriculum review workshops on implementing ALM into a program. I did a few of these as well over the last four weeks.

I am very grateful to Major Chad Foster, director of Military Science 300 (juniors) for giving me permission to post this on my blog. The following is his After Action Review he received from the 15 instructors who took the course:

Overall Assessment: The ALM workshop that you executed for us was instrumental in getting our new instructors to “buy-in” to the new teaching methodology that we are utilizing in our new MS300 course. It uilt on a lot of things that I had been saying to them previously, but it went farther in communicating the spirit and intent of ALM than anything else that we did as part of our new instructor integration and training.

  • The use of your simple decision-making games (whether of a tactical variety or not) demonstrated that TDGs are simple but incredibly effective tools that instructors can use to teach concepts to cadets. At first, some of the new instructors were worried due to their inexperience with certain types of tactical operations (not everyone is a “trigger-puller” by trade). These simple games showed them that you don’t have to have spent your entire career behind a machine gun or on a tank to teach in this manner.
  • Two of the tactical decision-making games (TDGs) that you had the new instructors design as part of your workshop have been used in the classroom already in MS300. This shows that not only did the new instructors gain a full understanding of the concept of ALM, but our course gained actual course material from the workshop.
  • I had multiple instructors say “Wow, I really get what we are trying to do now” after the workshop. The level of enthusiasm for the course really shot off the proverbial chart in the subsequent days. This led to the new instructors actually building multiple TDGs for the course, helping out the course directors immensely.
  • By my own participation in the workshop, I was better able to conduct training and orientation with my “veteran” instructors who missed the workshop. I executed a “poor man’s version” of your ALM workshop with my old guys with great results. I was concerned initially that I would not have the time to get everyone squared away prior to the first day of classes, but this turned out not to be the case. In a matter of a few hours, I had everyone on the same page regarding how we were going to implement ALM in MS300. That would not have been possible without your workshop.
  • The participation of Mr. Leland from the Walpole Police Department was of great value. He brought a different but highly relevant perspective to the discussions. His ideas and input during the workshop were outstanding, and I think that my new instructors (and I) gained a lot from the experience.
  • The participation of the Sienna University ROTC PMS was also great in terms of building a strong relationship with a fellow officer who is in the business of building strong future LTs. He and I have corresponded often since, sharing ideas and material. In fact, he is bringing his MS3 instructors up to West Point to observe some of our classes next month AND we are planning a joint field exercise with some of his cadets and our cadets in the tactics clubs.

Bottom-Line: The ALM Workshop was a fantastic experience that I am going to recommend that we continue next summer as part of our new instructor training in DMI. Thank you for all of your efforts and assistance.

If you are interested in my workshop, please contact Ms Jeannine Adams listed on the contact page of the blog and my web page. I must remind my readers that my workshop is applicable to organizations outside the Army as well. I have already done workshops for academic, police and first responders, as well as business, and all feedback has been excellent. The only negative feedback was that people said they wanted more.

Fred Leland and I are hosting our workshop (same as above) on the 14th of October up in Walpole, MA, please see Fred’s web site and blog.

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My recent three day visit to Fort Gordon and the U.S. Army Signal School or Center of Excellence went very well.  The commander and leaders of 442 Signal Battalion made me extremely welcome, and were very receptive to Adatpive Leader Methodology (ALM).  I now reposition to Fort Benning to conduct three workshops. ALong the way, I plan to travel the grounds over which the Civil War N. Georgia campaign, from Dalton to Atlanta were followed.

Don

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I had a good last week at Fort Monroe Virginia (actually Hampton Virginia home to the beautiful campus of Hampton University). I was lecturing, along with my friend Morgan Darwin, Army leaders that run ROTC programs throughout the nation on new techniques to develop adaptability and raise the bar on professionalism. I only lectured for two hours, but most importantly talked to several leaders in Cadet Command about how to get better at developing their cadets.

Work remains to be done, adapting their curriculum and program of instruction to the adaptive leader methodology, but Major Chad Foster, course director of the Military Science 3 (juniors) at the United States Military Academy’s Department of Military Instruction (DMI), hard work is helping out. Chad has worked every day since April (when we first met) changing lesson plans to ones applicable to the ALM model.  Each lesson, or most of them, now begin with a Tactical Decision Game, but more importantly, it is the way the teachers facilitate the classes that is key. They do not lecture by power point any more, but instead drive the students to seek the answers for themselves.

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The second in the series of manuals and revisions from the 4GW Seminar at MCB Quantico, FMFM 1-3A, A Tactical Handbook for Counterinsurgency and Police Operations.

Here’s the preface:

Why another hip-pocket guide for counterinsurgency? What makes this different? This handbook is an offering from a group of Marine officers who feel that current doctrine is rapidly diverging from the intent of maneuver doctrine. Where other manuals aim to put current conflicts into the Maoist/Nationalist mold of the Twentieth century and aim to identify successful techniques, this book seeks to bring about a change in approach and thinking which is timeless. In an age where war is no longer monopolized by armies but is waged by non-governmental entities, ethnic groups, tribes, federal agencies and militias, we find it necessary to look to parallels and successful thought processes in the inter-agency arena. This we may apply to the current and future conflicts of a 4GW nature. Our hope is to complement the FMFM-1A and provide a useful springboard of thoughts and practices.

Available from the d-n-i.net 4GW Manuals page.

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As they say, it is always better when it comes from someone else’s mouth, than yours when trying to “sell” or promote your work.

I had an outstanding week at the US Military Academy at West Point. The instructors there from the director down are great people to work with, and are moving to evolve the way DMI develops adaptability in our future leaders. I also invited my friend and comrade, Lieutenant Fred Leland of the Walpo Police Department (outside Boston MA) to attend my workshop and meet several of the instructors at the USMA Department of Military Instruction (DMI). DMI is likened to what ROTC does, focuses on the military education portion of a cadet’s development (while other departments or the college focuses on academic development). My intention of inviting Fred was to give instructors of DMI his prospective of using Adaptive Leader Methodology (ALM). Fred used my book Raising the Bar: Creating and Nurturing Adaptive Leaders to Deal with the Changing Face of War as a foundational document to reform his police department.

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John Baldoni interviewed me recently regarding the acceptance of my leadership model called Adaptive Leader Methodology (ALM) by the U.S. Army (ALM is outlined in Chapter 3 of my book Raising the Bar as Adaptive Course Model ACM (U.S. Army did not like that name)). John is a friend and a leadership consultant, coach, and speaker. His work centers on how leaders can use their authority, communications and presence to build trust and drive results. He is the author of six books on leadership, including How Great Leaders Get Great Results (which I highly recommend). In 2007 John was named one of the world’s top 30 leadership gurus by Leadership Gurus International. For more on John and his work, visit www.johnbaldoni.com

A Methodology for Leading Into the Unknown

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I received great and numerous responses from my “Culture of Incompetence” posting. So, I will use it as an excuse to post the first announcement for my next book  Military Recruiting: Finding and Preparing Future Soldiers (hit this link to get an overview). Military Recruiting: Finding and Preparing Soldiersis due out in late October.  I told Praeger more than a year ago when they asked me to do it, that it was not going to be a book of statistics. If they wanted that, then go to the think tank RAND.

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Along with BG (ret.) James Warner, I was invited by Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Institute for National Strategic Studies of the National Defense University to speak at a round table called “Building Adaptive Leaders.”

Here is a transcript of what I talked about (BG Warner focused on the operational and strategic levels of development, and our views parallel and support one another).

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I am a very blessed individual.

Why?

Well, I get to teach a course using the Civil War as a foundation to teach leadership at a place I love, for a university I admire (Georgetown), around some fantastic students who are our potential leaders in the political, government, non-profit and corporate world, and I get paid for it.

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